Category Archives: Pre-service teacher education (EFL and CLIL)

Sharing our Co-teaching experience

In our third year of implementing co-teaching strategies in the Education degrees at Universidad Pontificia Comillas, we are lucky to have received some attention from our own institution.

Following the publication of my article on how we try to develop the collaborative teacher competence in our students, the university’s marketing department suggested to shoot a video of us in action. Although the suggested moment in the year didn’t coincide with our team taught CLIL course, Lyndsay Buckingham and I organized a special (and hopefully enjoyable) review at the end of a first semester course, and invited Magdalena Custodio to supervise some of the student tasks. The final result was this:

Soon after, a piece on the same topic was published in Comillas magazine’s 100th issue. You can find it here, pages 28-29.

Leave a comment

Filed under Higher education, Pre-service teacher education (EFL and CLIL), Publication

Back to paper: supporting university student learning in the age of screens

Two years ago I had a particularly revealing experience in one of my classes. As I walked around monitoring student work, I noticed that at least two thirds of them were using their lap-top computer for purposes unrelated to the class. It was March, and many of them were editing drafts of their TFG (end of degree dissertation). Others were chatting on Whatsapp. Many were doing both.

Laptops abound in class!

Students sometimes come to class with the idea that they can sit through the session minding their own business and somehow make up for it at home, just reading through the Powerpoint presentation. That may be so in cases of traditional lecturer-centered instruction, but it is misled in the kind of student-centered learning scenarios recommended in this blog. And even more so when students are trying to process concepts and ideas in a foreign language, as in many EMI settings.

That same year, I visited PH Zug, in Switzerland, where I was initially surprised by my Swiss colleague’s use of a course package much resembling the ones I used in my student time in the 1990s. A paper package in the age of Moodle and e-campuses?

Sample pages from an ELT Methodology package used at PH Zug, Switzerland

Looking at its contents, I noticed that it offered a nice combination of theory, tasks and, perhaps more importantly, space and boxes for students to record their notes. I shared this with my colleagues back at Comillas and, while not moving away from Moodle-centered documentation, we have lately been handing out a number of worksheets such as the one below:

The rationale is simple. In an age in which students are reluctant to take notes, worksheets help students to have an outline of the class, as well as an opportunity (if not an obligation) to keep a record of their tasks and discussions – and this without the need to open the laptop. And even if the students choose to complete the worksheet in digital format (also available), the task-oriented nature of such documents help them stay focused, instead of drifting off.

Further, in EMI settings, we have found that the worksheet approach helps to scaffold group work, peer discussion and, especially, speaking in the foreign language during feedback stages.

As perhaps the most obvious con, this approach uses more paper…so let’s make sure our paper is recycled!

Leave a comment

Filed under EMI, Higher education, Pre-service teacher education (EFL and CLIL)

Padres y Maestros 378: Retos de la enseñanza bilingüe

He tenido el honor de ser editor invitado del número 378 de Padres y Maestros, publicado en Junio de 2019. Cuando el Director de la revista, Vicente Hernández-Franco, me propuso la tarea de tratar la cuestión de la enseñanza bilingüe, allá por octubre de 2017, enseguida me di cuenta de que no podíamos enfocar esta publicación como otro resumen de los aspectos e implicaciones principales del AICLE (Aprendizaje Integrado de Contenidos y Lengua Extranjera; CLIL en inglés). CLIL ya está en fase de madurez teórica y práctica, y su mejora, a nuestro entender, tiene que ver son afrontar una serie de retos bastante concretos. Preguntas tales como

¿Cuál debe ser el nuevo rol de la asignatura de Inglés en contextos AICLE?

¿Cómo se asegura una eficaz evaluación tanto del aprendizaje de contenidos curriculares como del uso de la lengua extranjera?

¿Cómo se pueden emplear a los auxiliares de conversación para desarrollar la competencia intercultural de nuestros alumnos?

¿Están bien formados los maestros AICLE? ¿Qué podemos hacer desde la universidad para mejorar su capacitación inicial?

¿Cómo conjugar AICLE y una renovación metodológica basada en las llamadas metodologías activas?

¿Es AICLE compatible con la educación en entornos socialmente desfavorecidos y en centros de difícil desempeño?

Estas cuestiones son contestadas por un estupendo equipo de autores, desde prestigiosos investigadores de CLIL como Ana Halbach o Tom Morton, hasta maestros en activo que reflexionan sobre ellas en el contexto de su particular práctica docente en centros públicos y concertados, como Rebeca Morán, Emma de la Peña y Raúl Pollán. Además, me hace especial ilusión, como editor, contar con los artículos de mis compañeras de equipo Lyndsay Buckingham y Magdalena Custodio, que abordan, respectivamente, el mejor uso de los auxiliares de conversación para desarrollar la competencia intercultural de los alumnos, y los retos formativos del docente AICLE.

Leave a comment

Filed under Español, Infant and Primary, Pre-service teacher education (EFL and CLIL), Publication

Our Co-teaching experience: An assessment after year 1

In the previous entry, I was reflecting on the challenge of planning and delivering a university course in a truly collaboratively way.

Well, my colleagues Magdalena Custodio and Lyndsay Buckingham and myself just presented an analysis of our first year of co-teaching together, in the framework of Instituto Franklin’s 4th International Conference on Bilingual Education in a Globalized World, that took place in Alcalá de Henares on November 16-18, 2018.

You may find a summary of our theoretical framework, as well as a description of our experience and main findings here:

On top of improving our co-taught coursework this year, we hope to build a more systematic research framework and investigate what makes co-teaching a positive factor in our classes, and to what extent exposure to this strategy can influence teacher trainees in their professional growth.

IMG_20181117_125306_416

The CLIL Team!

1 Comment

Filed under Higher education, Pre-service teacher education (EFL and CLIL), Sin categoría

Thinking Routines in CLIL

On 20 October 2017 I delivered a tall about Thinking Routines and CLIL teaching at IV CIEB Conference. For easy reference, I have published the PowerPoint I used on Slideshare – please find it below.

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Infant and Primary, Pre-service teacher education (EFL and CLIL), Presentations

A Teacher Training Workshop in Bangkok, Thailand

CLIL and EMI is not only big in Europe – it seems to be on the rise everywhere. This is what I found during an intense and exciting day at the School of Liberal Arts at King Monkut’s University of Technology, where I conducted a two-hour workshop on Scaffolding Techniques in CLIL/EMI, and most important, had a chance to meet with lecturers, Masters students and Secondary school teachers who are interested in EMI in Secondary and Tertiary education.

IMG_20170815_140308208

The workshop was organized as a taster of the more intensive training I offer EMI lecturers at Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, and sought to engage participants in reflecting on the rationale of scaffolding learning when teaching through a foreign language, as well as applying a number of reception, transformation and production scaffolds suited to the learner’s language and subject competence.

IMG_25600815_154134

I am particularly grateful to the faculty at KMUTT, especially Richard Watson Todd and Ornkanya Yaoharee, for their invitation and for making the workshop possible.

Leave a comment

Filed under Pre-service teacher education (EFL and CLIL), Presentations

Brainwriting colaborativo en CLIL

En esta entrada quería compartir con vosotros una estrategia que he implementado este año en algunas de mis clases. Se trata de utilizar la técnica del Brainwalking para generar ideas de forma colaborativa y añadiendo, además, la peculiaridad de realizarlo fuera de clase. Esta actividad se realizó en dos clases, con la finalidad de generar ideas para consensuar una rúbrica de evaluación para un trabajo de curso. (Los detalles sobre esta forma de evaluación están en esta otra entrada.)
brainwriting 3

¿Qué es brainwalking?

El brainstorming o lluvia de ideas consiste, como es bien sabido, en generar ideas de forma oral, aunque puedan registrarse por escrito. El brainwriting introduce el matiz de que cada persona o grupo elabora un texto o anotación que luego circula y es a su vez fuente de reflexión y más input escrito por parte de los demás autores. Pues bien, el brainwriting añade un matiz kinestésico al proceso: son los participantes, y no el papel, quienes circulan.

¿Ventajas?

  • Optimizamos la exposición a las ideas de los demás, fomentando además la lectura activa: no se trata solo de leer, sino de comentar.
  • Rompemos la rutina habitual de realizar tareas grupales en el aula, o de que siempre hablen los mismos en el momento de la puesta en común.
  • Generamos un clima de trabajo más relajado en el que los miembros del grupo pueden adoptar roles diferentes a los habituales, a veces más activos y responsables.
  • Seguramente hay estudiantes con un perfil más kinestésico que piensan mejor de pie o con la posibilidad de caminar cada pocos minutos.
  • Mandamos un importante mensaje simbólico: el aprendizaje no es algo que tenga lugar exclusivamente en el aula.
  • Del mismo modo, generamos un ambiente de centro más abierto, donde el trabajo de una clase está abierto al resto del alumnado.

 

brainwalking Foto 26-11-15 15 11 31

Leave a comment

Filed under EMI, Español, Higher education, Pre-service teacher education (EFL and CLIL)

Redundancia, colaboración y evaluación formativa en CLIL

En esta entrada vamos hablar de innovación. No a nivel macro, es decir, de cómo las instituciones educativas se decantan por determinadas apuestas innovadoras y tratan de canalizarlas, sino a nivel micro, o sea, de mejoras “locales” que, de forma relativamente sencilla, puedo incorporar a mi docencia. En enseñanza superior -que es donde yo doy mis clases- este nivel es particularmente importante, ya que, muy a menudo, las instituciones no se preocupan lo suficiente por  el enfoque más global mencionado anteriormente.

A grandes rasgos, mi metodología es la siguiente. Una vez que aprendo sobre algún recurso—ya sea en algún curso de formación, o a través de lecturas o vídeos—trato de ponerlo en práctica de forma intensiva sistemática durante uno o dos cursos completos y, si es posible, en más de una asignatura o con más de un grupo. Después de ese curso, evalúo como ha ido la experiencia, y trato de “aligerar” un poco el uso de ese recurso o metodología, pero tratando de quedarme con aquellas aplicaciones que han resultado más beneficiosas.

En cursos anteriores, he trabajado de esta forma, por ejemplo, el uso de weblogs para que los alumnos publiquen sus escritos, los organizadores gráficos en asignaturas de ciencias sociales o, más recientemente, la utilización de las rutinas de pensamiento fundamentales en diferentes asignaturas impartidas en lengua inglesa.

Este curso, he decidido apostar por la calidad del proceso de elaboración de los trabajos de los estudiantes, principalmente a través de la potenciación del rol de le evaluación formativa y las actividades de metacognición. A continuación os presento una de las aplicaciones realizadas que, si bien se llevó a cabo con alumnos de 4º curso de Grado, es perfectamente exportable a otras etapas educativas.

 

collaborative timeline

CLIL micro-teaching – timelines colaborativas

 

1.- EL CONTEXTO

Como parte de la asignatura “Formación para el Bilingüismo”, estudiantes de cuarto curso del Grado de Ed. Primaria tienen que programar una unidad didáctica de Social Science o Natural Science que ejemplifique los principios del AICLE / CLIL trabajados en la primera parte de la asignatura. El trabajo se corrige a través de una rúbrica de evaluación; en este caso, en su forma más sencilla y abierta de  checklist de items a tener en cuenta, y que incluye aspectos tales como la capacidad de integrar de forma práctica las 4Cs de CLIL, el input lingüístico o la elaboración de materiales atractivos para el alumno de Ed. Primaria

Hasta ahora, junto con las instrucciones del trabajo se presentaba y comentaba la rúbrica. En los últimos años, he procurado dedicar alguna sesión de clase a clarificar alguno de sus aspectos; incluso, a elaborar  esa misma lista de ítems de forma consensuada con los alumnos.

 

Fragmento del checklist

 

2.- EL PROBLEMA

Este procedimiento, que ya utilizo con el mismo grupo en un curso anterior, tiene la ventaja de facilitar una evaluación sumativa bastante objetiva. Sin embargo, comprobando la calidad de los trabajos finales, he podido comprobar que, sin más hincapié en el checklist como instrumento de evaluación formativa, este procedimiento solo ayuda a aquellos alumnos o grupos de alumnos que, en todo caso, ya son capaces de ayudarse a sí mismos a superar la asignatura con éxito. O, dicho de otra manera, que presentar un checklist en clase—o, incluso, redactarlo de forma consensuada con los alumnos—no garantiza el que la mayoría de los alumnos lo tenga en cuenta a la hora de diseñar sus unidades didácticas. Por el contrario, hacía falta cambiar el procedimiento para aumentar la exposición de TODOS los alumnos a los contenidos de la rúbrica.

 

3.- LOS CAMBIOS IMPLEMENTADOS 

Con este problema en mente, los cambios implementados este curso han sido los siguientes.

a) En primer lugar, realizar el diseño del checklist de una forma más motivadora, mediante un proceso de brainwalking colaborativo realizado en los mismos grupos de trabajo.  De esta forma, los alumnos no solo tenían que “publicar” su propia propuesta de rúbrica, sino, también, pasearse e ir haciendo observaciones sobre las rúbricas elaboradas por los demás grupos.

El análisis de este recurso se encuentra en esta otra entrada.

 

brainwalking                        brainwriting 1

 

b) Se estableció una primera fecha de entrega—realizada a través de una carpeta en línea compartida por todo el grupo— a partir de la cual se abría un plazo de una semana para que los diferentes grupos utilizaran la misma rúbrica para evaluarse los unos a los otros, poniendo el foco en formular sugerencias de mejora. Al final de este plazo, los diferentes grupos tenían la ocasión de subir a la misma carpeta compartida la versión mejorada de su trabajo, siempre dejando claro cuáles habían sido los puntos de mejora. De esta forma, se aseguraba que todos los alumnos tuvieran que utilizar la rúbrica de evaluación al menos una vez, y de una forma que exigía la comprensiónde sus diferentes apartados.

 

3.- LOS RESULTADOS

A falta de seguir probando y evaluando este procedimiento en cursos venideros y así poder obtener unos resultados más fiables, la experiencia de este curso parece sugerir que

  • La calidad media de los trabajos ha mejorado, notándose de forma significativa en los trabajos de nivel medio y en los de peor puntuación. Teniendo en cuenta que la tarea de evaluar las UDs de los demás grupos era obligatoria, parece que una mayor exposición tanto a la rúbrica de evaluación como a los trabajos de los compañeros puede haber incidido en esta mejora general
  • Las notas medias en el examen final han sido comparables o incluso ligeramente superiores al de cursos anteriores, a pesar de ser sensiblemente inferiores en la asignatura cursada en tercer curso. En este caso, parece que, en efecto, se ha producido una mayor redundancia conceptual en el proceso de diseño y utilización de los checklists, donde aparecían la mayoría de los conceptos, recursos y estrategias evaluadas en el examen final.
  • Los alumnos—preguntados de modo informal durante una de las sesiones— respondieron muy positivamente tanto a la sesión de brainwalking como a la posibilidad de sugerir mejoras a sus compañeros y a su vez recibir sugerencias de mejora para sus trabajos.

 

4.- LAS CONCLUSIONES

La principal conclusión que he podido extraer tanto de esta experiencia, como de otras similares realizadas en otras asignaturas, es que un recurso de evaluación formativa—ya sea una rúbrica, el uso de un código de corrección a escritos en inglés, anotaciones en un margen, etc.—no surge efecto de forma automática, sino que hay que programar su comprensión “activa” por parte del alumno. Esto es especialmente cierto en el caso de los alumnos cuyo rendimiento se sitúa en los niveles más bajos de la clase.

Por otro lado, el diseño colaborativo de rúbricas de evaluación—por sencillas que puedan ser—es una buena herramienta metacognitiva para asegurarnos que el alumno trabaja hacia un objetivo claro y previamente definido, que además es más fácil de interiorizar que si simplemente lo hubiera recibido del profesor.

En definitiva, seguramente muchos hemos oído hablar de las ventajas de la evaluación por rúbricas, o de la importancia de la evaluación formativa en CLIL/AICLE. Ya que, en ambos casos, se trata de estrategias que requieren de bastante esfuerzo por parte de los profesores, creo que merece la pena implementarlos de tal forma que el beneficio para nuestros alumnos sea el máximo posible.

 

1 Comment

Filed under EMI, Higher education, Pre-service teacher education (EFL and CLIL)

3 principios para usar bien un libro de texto en Primaria

(¡…y que no sea él el que nos utilice a nosotros!)

3 principios

Llegó septiembre, y con él aparecen a clase nuestros queridos alumnos con sus mochilas de ruedas llenas de ilusiones, esperanzas, algún miedo….y, sobre todo, de libros de texto costosamente forrados por sus sufridos padres, abuelos o tutores legales.

En este blog ya hemos denunciado los peligros de una cultura escolar basada en la sobreutilización de este recurso. Vamos a suponer ahora que, por X razones —que darían para otro artículo— nos vemos obligados a utilizarlos en nuestras clases. Lo que presento a continuación son tres sencillos principios, de aplicación casi universal, que nos pueden ayudar a sacar el máximo partido a los libros mientras que reducimos sus daños colaterales. Están inspirados en mis años de experiencia como profesor de inglés, pero, también, de mi observación de muchas clases de Lengua, “Cono” / Science e inglés.

 

Principio 1: no tengas prisa por que lo abran

La razón es sencilla. Los primeros minutos de clase sirven para activar a los alumnos, lo cual conlleva aspectos cognitivos, afectivos y motivacionales. De forma simbólica, queremos decirle al alumno que

  • en esta clase vamos a partir de lo que sabe, piensa o puede predecir para conocer cosas nuevas.
  • este proceso va a ser grupal y “personalizado” (cada grupo es diferente) y, si es posible, divertido.
  • por lo tanto, “lo importante” de este proceso está fuera, y no dentro, del libro.

¿Alternativas? Infinitas. Diálogo con todo el grupo, apoyado (o no) por imágenes en la PDIo pantalla; lluvia de ideas, rutinas de pensamiento…Idealmente, que de las tareas de activación surja una duda o pregunta que pueda ser contestada por la lectura del libro.

 

Principio 2: sustituye lo sustituible

Hay muchas partes de la típica unidad de un libro que son fácilmente prescindibles. Ejemplos:

  • Las preguntas, imágenes o lecturas de activación al principio de las unidades son fácilmente reemplazables por otras obtenidas por nosotros, y que además pueden partir de la realidad cotidiana de los alumnos (cole, barrio, ciudad, región, etc.) ¿Por qué mirar una foto de un río genérico cuando podemos proyectar una del río que pasa cerca del cole?
  • Las partes al final de las unidades también se prestan a ser sustituidas o, cuando menos, “tuneadas”: los típicos proyectos o experimentos de Ciencia Social / Natural, los esquemas o resúmenes, las preguntas de autoevaluación…Podemos incluso “copiarlas”, pero realizarlas con el libro cerrado, como una actividad aparte.

 

Principio 3: evita la rutina

Este principio es aplicable incluso si decidimos ignorar los dos anteriores. Aquí el objetivo es evitar el clásico “Fulanito, lee” que hace que Fulanito se entere de poco, sus compañeros de menos aún, y todos nos aburramos soberanamente. Algunas ideas al respecto:

  • Parece obvio, pero a veces nos olvidamos de que leer no es sinónimo de leer en voz alta. Sobre todo en grupos de niños más mayores (tercero en adelante) podemos pedir a los alumnos que lean en silencio o, mejor, en equipo, centrándose en el significado del texto y no en la forma oral.
  • Lógicamente, también podemos apoyarnos en las grabaciones de los textos que vienen, sobre todo, en los métodos bilingües. Así trabajamos la comprensión auditiva y proporcionamos un modelo de pronunciación correcta.
  • Como sugiere la didáctica de la lectura, es una buena idea proponer tareas de lectura antes de la misma. Pueden ser preguntas sencillas, p.e. de verdadero o falso, si o no, etc. Si el alumno escucha la grabación del tema, se pueden proponer actividades de respuesta física, (Total Physical Response), del estilo “levanta la mano cuando oigas el nombre de un animal”.

Hacerlo proporciona una razón auténtica para leer (no solo que lo pida el profe) y, además, ayuda al niño a leer mejor, ya que, en la vida real, casi siempre leemos con una finalidad en mente (buscar un dato concreto, sacar una idea general, seguir una secuencia de instrucciones, etc.) y nuestros esquemas mentales adecuan la lectura a dicho objetivo.

  • Otro tanto vale para las preguntas o actividades de comprensión que suelen seguir a los textos. Aquí es recomendable alternar diferentes formas de interacción: a veces podemos resolverlas juntos, otras preguntar individualmente, otras en parejas, grupos o equipos…Es importante tener en cuenta que algunos alumnos necesitan algo más de tiempo para procesar la información —incluso pedir ayuda a sus compañeros— así que, como regla general, resulta beneficioso que los alumnos tengan algo de tiempo para preparar sus respuestas.

Se podrá pensar que este diseño alternativo consume demasiado tiempo. No necesariamente: ya que, de alguna manera, estamos integrando las preguntas o tareas de comprensión / refuerzo dentro de la propia lectura. Además, al estar promoviendo una lectura más significativa, es más probable que el alumno recuerde lo leído y lo integre en sus esquemas mentales, reduciendo el tiempo que necesitaremos para repasarlo.

Obviamente, no estamos hablando de que cada página del libro se convierta en una aventura impredecible, pero si en alternar varios canales y formas de interacción para, por un lado, reducir la rutina y, por otro, ayudar a nuestros alumnos a ser mejores lectores.

 

Conclusión

Creo que estos tres sencillos principios son válidos y aplicables en la mayoría de los contextos que nos podemos encontrar en Ed. Primaria y Secundaria. Al final, como en otros aspectos de la didáctica, se trata de aceptar, por fin, la idea básica de que es el alumno el que aprende, y no el profesor el que enseña o, peor aun, se limita a transmitir información. Y “negociar” en nuestras aulas con el hecho de que, aunque los alumnos de hoy tienen una relación con la información y el conocimiento muy diferente a la que tenían los de ayer, los libros de texto, por lo general, no han evolucionado al mismo ritmo. Eso, suponiendo que sean capaces de hacerlo.

Espero que este texto os haya sugerido alguna idea o matiz que podáis incorporar a vuestras clases. Os agradezco cualquier aportación, sugerencia o crítica.

2 Comments

Filed under Infant and Primary, Pre-service teacher education (EFL and CLIL)

Aprendizaje basado en proyectos (ABP) – bibliografía

aprendizaje por proyectos

Como continuación a la entrada sobre la sesión sobre ABP celebrada en el CES Don Bosco, os pongo a continuación una selección de fuentes y recursos sobre el tema. Gracias a las profesoras Rosa Fernández y Arantxa de las Heras, y a Noemí Marina, por muchas de estas sugerencias.

Libros:

  • El piso de debajo de la escuela (M. Díaz Navarro).
  • La oreja verde de la escuela (M. Díaz Navarro).
  • Mi escuela sabe a naranja (M. Díaz Navarro).
  • Proyectando otra escuela (M. Díaz Navarro).
  • Con ojos de niño (F. Tonnuci)
  • Educación Infantil, respuesta educativa a la diversidad (Gema Paniagua, Jesús Palacios).
  • Padres brillantes, maestros fascinantes (Augusto Cury)

Cuentos:

  • Las palabras dulces (Ed. Corimbo).
  • A qué sabe la luna (Ed. Kalandraka).
  • Pequeño azul pequeño amarillo (Ed. Kalandraka)

Otros recursos:

¿Se os ocurre alguna otra referencia de interés sobre el tema?

Leave a comment

Filed under Infant and Primary, Pre-service teacher education (EFL and CLIL)